Lost libido in women: Let’s Marvin Gaye & get this conversation on!

Reduced sex drive in women can have a profound negative impact on their quality of life.  When sexual desire decreases there really isn’t a pill you can pop or food you can eat that will miraculously create the urge to merge (Arcos, 2004).

There is no one solution because we women are complex!  It could be due to altered hormone levels, decreased vaginal lubrication, and/or pain – especially common with thyroid disorders and throughout menopause.  Or flagging libido could be a hint at a more serious underlying health concern needing investigation (Arcos, 2004).

So what can you do when you want to get it on?

As an evidence based practitioner I abhor the massive ads on billboards and social media claiming miracle responses in pills and potions for this very complex issue.  It is not a well researched topic in the scientific literature so I can’t support strong claims on the effectiveness of any product unless I see the research… in short …show me the data (Just warning you now if you follow that link you’ll get 2 glorious minutes of early-Tom Cruise &  a half naked Cuba Gooding under the guise of it being related to evidence based solutions …surely permissible on a post about female libido )

So do we give up? No not at all! There are many strategies that have been shown time and again to work to restore desire it’s just that if they don’t work for you it’s time to do some investigative work with a trained professional to get to the bottom of why your libido is lost.

I often find myself using these strategies with my clients with some degree of usefulness.

Arginine

L-arginine, an amino acid, is the precursor to nitric oxide involved in the relaxation of (vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle of) the clitoris and vagina (Kellogg-Spadt & Albaugh, 2003).

Arginine is a widely used and typically helpful therapy for assisting men to achieve erection and it seems in the early research on women it could also be useful to enhance female orgasm and female desire (Youngworth, Chek, & Zaslau, 2001).

If you have a history of the herpes simplex virus you need to know that high doses of L-arginine can potentiate oral and/or genital herpes outbreaks.

Damiana

female desire, women libido, sex drive, thyroid, menopause,
Damiana Image: herb-info.com

Damiana is a plant used traditionally in herbalism as an aphrodisiac for women.  It is thought it works to enhance dopamine levels in the brain (Kellogg-Spadt & Albaugh, 2003).

 

Although there are no quality studies on Damiana used alone anecdotal reports tout the effectiveness of a daily cup of Damiana tea for increasing female sexual desire (Ratsch, 1997; Watson, 1993).  A cup of organic, herbal tea which tastes quite nice is a pretty cheap, low risk strategy to try and you never know it might just work for you!

L-arginine & Damiana used together

Preliminary double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of oral supplements containing L-arginine and Damiana have demonstrated that up to 70% of pre and postmenopausal women experience significant improvement in desire and sexual responsiveness after 4 to 6 weeks of daily use (Trant & Polan, 2000).

Relaxation & Marvin Gaye

The cycle of sexual response begins in the brain, where a memory, an image, a scent, music, or a fantasy can act as a trigger to prompt sexual arousal.  Thus, the brain may be the key and good starting place for treatment of sexual dysfunction (Arcos, 2004).

female desire, sex drive, libido, thyroid, menopause
Damiana Image: herb-info.com

My prescription is for at least 15 uninterrupted minutes in a relaxing bath with

Marvin Gaye’s soulful notes

 

Just like they say in the song, let’s Marvin Gaye and get it on…. 

If you’d like to talk about lifting your libido contact me via www.facebook.com/SoniaMcNaughton.Naturopath or for an appointment (02) 4968 2157.

To source Damiana tea & l-Arginine contact me via:  www.facebook.com/SoniaMcNaughton.Naturopath

 

Featured Image from: Treatment Today

Arcos, B. (2004). Female sexual function and response. The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, 104(1_suppl), 16S-20S.

Billups, K., Berman, L., Berman, J. Metz, M., Glennon, M., & Goldstein, I. (2001). A new non-pharmacological vacuum therapy for female sexual dysfunction. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 27,435-420.

Kellogg-Spadt, S., & Albaugh, J. A. (2003). Herbs, amino acids, and female libido. Urologic Nursing, 23(2), 160.

Modelska, K., & Cummings, S. (2003). Female sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women: Systematic review of placebo-controlled trials. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 188(1), 286-293.

Meston, C.M., & Worcel, M. (2000). The effects of l-arginine and yohimbe on sexual arousal in postmenopausal women with SAD. Proceedings from the Female Sexual Function Forum, Boston, MA.

Munariz, R., Talakoub, L., & Garcia, S. (2001). DHEA treatment for female androgen insufficiency and sexual dysfunction. Proceedings from the Female Sexual Function Forum, Boston, MA.

Ratsch, C. (1997). Plants of love. Berkeley, CA: Ten-Speed Press.

Trant, A.S., & Polan, M.L. (2000). Clinical study on a nutritional supplement for the enhancement of female sexual function.  Proceedings from the Female Sexual Function Forum, Boston, MA.

Watson, C.M. (1993). Love potions. New York: GP Putnam Books.

Youngworth, H., Chek, K., & Zaslau, S. (2001). A topical therapyfor female sexual dysfunction: Results of a pilot study with1 year follow-up. Proceedings from the Female Sexual Function Forum, Boston, MA.

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